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Concerned about secondhand
smoke in your building?

Unfortunately, secondhand smoke exposure in multi-unit dwellings such as apartments and condominiums is a common problem and dangerous for you and your family.

Secondhand smoke can seep into multi-unit dwellings from vents and cracks in walls or floors. Based on several studies, an estimated 44 percent to 53 percent of multi-unit housing residents that do not allow smoking in their home and have experienced secondhand smoke exposure in their home from elsewhere in or around the building.

THESE STEPS MAY HELP IF YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THIS SITUATION.

1

CHECK YOUR LEASE

Check to see if smoking is addressed anywhere in your lease or if there are local laws in place

2

TALK TO YOUR NEIGHBOR

If you know where it is coming from, see if you can come to an agreement about where and when they smoke.

3

EDUCATE YOUR NEIGHBORS

Educate your neighbors about how secondhand smoke may affect them and their family.

4

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR

Talk with your doctor if secondhand smoke is affecting your health and ask for a note from them that states the impact secondhand smoke is having on your health.

5

COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR LANDLORD

Talk with your landlord/property manager about the secondhand smoke problem in your apartment.
a.) If your building does not have an indoor smoke-free policy ask them about adopting one.
b.) Ask them to conduct a tenant survey to gauge the views of residents about a policy prohibiting smoking in
all indoor areas.

6‍

Look for a  solution

Remember that trying to fix the problem by plugging underneath your door or sealing cracks in your walls may solve the problem temporarily, but most likely not permanently.
7

Research Resources

The Federal Fair Housing Act could be used if secondhand smoke is causing breathing difficulties. Click here for more information.
8

Consider Moving

If possible, consider moving to another property. If it comes to that, you should ask your landlord/property manager to waive any penalties for breaking your lease.
9

Take Legal Action

As a last resort, there are also other legal options. Click here for more information

Legal Options for Tenants
Exposed to Secondhand Smoke

downloadable resources

@ Alaska Smoke-Free Housing